Albums, Cigars of the Pharaoh, Herge, Moulinsart

When I first read the news story I thought it was a joke. But as sure as today’s October 21st, not April 1st, these news come in all seriousness. Casterman and Moulinsart plan on creating one more Tintin album, and its release date is set for 2052. Wait, what?

But how? Why? Whatever happened to respecting Hergé’s wishes that nobody continue with the series? Well, I’ll post the article straight from Le Soir (or rather…from Le Soir through Google Translate. I’ve edited parts for clarity only, since I don’t know too much French, but, only at times, I know a little more than Google).  I didn’t fix everything, and some of the verb tenses are hard to straighten out, but you guys are smart…You’ll get the point.

 

In an exclusive interview with the Paris daily “Le Soir” and “The World” with Charlotte Gallimard, new director of Casterman and Mouchart Benedict, the new editorial director of the Franco-Belgian publishing house, Nick Rodwell, the head of Moulinsart, unleashed a scoop.In 2052, Casterman will be allowed to publish a new Tintin adventure, a year before Hergé’s work falls into the public domain.Nick Rodwell said that the mission of the heirs of the master of the clear line is to “protect and promote” his work. With this in mind, a new album will be the only way for him to prevent Bashibazoucks from making Tintin into everything and anything, 70 years after the author’s death.

During the meeting, Benedict and Charlotte Gallimard Mouchart also revealed the signing of a sponsorship agreement of the Hergé Museum in Louvain-la-Neuve and the publishing  next year of the “Secrets of Cigars of the Pharaoh ” by Casterman. This album celebrates 80 years of presence in the catalog Tintin Casterman. He will tell in pictures redesigned by Hergé Studios adventure published in black and white in 1934 to create the color album that we know today. Finally, Moulinsart and Casterman are also considering making a movie or a cartoon Jo Zette.

I’ll be honest, Tintinologists. I have very mixed feelings about this, but they are turning more and more negative the more I think about it.  Hergé didn’t want anybody making more Tintin albums. Tintin was his child, and for many years, Tintin literally took over the man’s life. To continue the series, especially so many years after his death, and still consider it official is really a bizarre and kind of uncomfortable idea. I agree with their intentions: I don’t want counterfeit Tintin’s to sprout up and turn Tintin into “everything and anything” either. But really, if that happens after whenever Tintin would become public domain, who does that really harm?

Such publications would fool nobody, especially 70 years after Hergé’s death. And honestly, as much as Moulinsart and whoever else wants to stop it, people already make Tintin into everything and anything. They just don’t easily get away with selling it. And while sure, some cases are “Tintin and Thailand”, many others are just innocent fan art. But nobody’s trying to say that those are official, “canonical” Tintin albums.

But Casterman and Moulinsart have everything to lose financially if they can no longer control who sells and markets Tintin. So in an effort to protect Hergé’s last wishes, they actually have to break them.

What I fear is that this may not become just “one extra album.” Fans will want more. Kids will want more. Compared with other comic books, 24 albums is a small number of adventures. And if the moneymakers can break the rules once, they may just break them again. I can just hear people ask, “After all the work it will take to produce that one super special album, why not take advantage of whoever creates it and let him make a few more?”

But for better or for worse, a lot can happen in forty years. Forty years ago Hergé was still making Tintin albums! What do you think, fans? Is this a good idea? Should we just wait it out and see? I wouldn’t expect too much news on this for a long, long time.

On the plus side, I think a Jo, Zette and Jocko movie would actually be a really good idea.

Sources:http://www.lesoir.be/344210/article/culture/livres/2013-10-21/un-sponsor-pour-musee-herge-et-un-nouvel-album-pour-tintin

Cigars of the Pharaoh, Trivia

Cigars of the Pharaoh: in the original black-and-white edition, there is an extra section that didn’t make the color cut. When Tintin finds the secret lair, he finds a bunch of snakes inside he has to pass. He throws a chocolate bar he has in his pocket in the corner and drives them toward it so he can cross safely. Indiana Jones ought to try that sometime…

Albums, Cigars of the Pharaoh, Destination Moon, Editorial, Explorers on the Moon, Flight 714, King Ottokar's Sceptre, Land of Black Gold, Prisoners of the Sun, Red Rackham's Treasure, The Black Island, The Blue Lotus, The Broken Ear, The Calculus Affair, The Castafiore Emerald, The Crab with the Golden Claws, The Red Sea Sharks, The Secret of the Unicorn, The Seven Crystal Balls, The Shooting Star, Tintin and the Picaros, Tintin in America, Tintin in the Congo, Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Tintin in Tibet, Tintin Merchandise, Tintin Movie News

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Cigars of the Pharaoh, Herge, Tintin and Snowy, Tintin's Friends

When Tintin and Snowy are cast a drift in sarcophagi during Cigars of the Pharaoh they are rescued by a passing arms dealer. That man was based on Henry de Monfreid, a french drug smuggler who became famous after the publication of the autobiographic Hashish: A Smuggler’s Tale and Secrets of the Red Sea.

Monfreid first went to the Red Sea in 1911 with the intent of trading in coffee but spent the next thirty years smuggling guns, hashish and diving for pearls. He also spent a fair amount in prison because of this. Following the outbreak of World War II he worked for the Italians until captured by the British. When the war was over he retired to France and continued to write. Over the next 30 years he wrote about 70 books. When money got tight he mortgaged the family collection of Gauguin. After his death these paintings were found to be fake.

Hashish: A Smuggler’s Tale was published in the early thirties just when Herge was writing Cigars of the Pharaoh. It seems odd that the conservative, strait-laced Herge should put a character like Monfreid in his book but one can imagine the exotic, devil-may-care, existence of the smuggler would appeal to the shy Belgium who had never left his country. Though possible it was Monfreid attitude to Germans that appeal. On seeing the Pyramids he couldn’t wait to leave. Saying “The only thing that one might possibly admire is the stupendous effort it took to build them, and this admiration demands the mentality of a German tourist.”